37 Weeks Pregnant And Can T Sleep At All

You’ve Got to Pee, Constantly

Unfortunately, frequent urination and pregnancy go hand in hand—right now, your baby is essentially using your bladder as a pillow. Even though drinking less water at night (you still need at least eight glasses total! ), you can try to avoid waking up in the middle of the night to use the restroom. When you wake up, concentrate on finding ways to quickly fall back asleep because too much waking prevents you from getting the deep sleep you require. Use low-wattage nightlights in the hallway and bathroom as one solution to keep the room dark while you’re awake. Bright lights are stimulating and can make you too awake.

Even though we understand that you’re tired, try to avoid taking a power nap after 3 p.m. m. That way, it’s less likely to disrupt your ability to sleep at night. (Also, limit the nap to 20 minutes to avoid feeling grouchy after waking up. ).

Try to prevent indigestion by not eating within two hours of going to bed and staying away from spicy foods if it is keeping you awake (blame the pregnancy hormones!). An over-the-counter antacid such as Tums or Rolaids is safe to take (but always double-check the dosage with your OB). More tips: Try raising the head of your bed a few inches, and sleep on your left side to prevent stomach acid from rising.

If you simply have trouble getting comfortable in bed once you’re in bed due to your large belly, but it’s especially bothersome, see your doctor. RLS affects about one in four pregnant women, according to the National Sleep Foundation. If you have it, you may not be consuming enough iron or folate, which are both essential nutrients for your baby’s development. If this is the case, you should up your intake.

Ugh. Swollen nasal passages and all that extra pregnancy weight can cause you to snore. Try nasal strips (like Breathe Right), which open nasal passages and improve airflow, if that’s what’s keeping you awake. Ask your doctor if a CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure) breathing machine could help if this is a persistent and serious issue.

How Does Sleep Change in the Third Trimester?

The third trimester is typically the most challenging for most women. Reliable Source National Library of Medicine, Biotech Information The National Center for Biotechnology Information promotes science and health by making biomedical and genomic data accessible. bringing about, among other things, sleep apnea, heartburn, and back pain. Trusted Source National Library of Medicine, Biotech Information The National Center for Biotechnology Information promotes science and health by making access to biomedical and genomic information available. It is also more challenging to get adequate rest. See Full Reference, but due to your changing body, you’ll also feel tired during the day.

According to estimates, two out of every three women Trusted Source National Library of Medicine, Biotech Information The National Center for Biotechnology Information promotes science and health by making biomedical and genomic information accessible suffer from sore muscles and lower back pain during pregnancy, which affects sleep. See Full Reference Typically, women who experience higher levels of depression or anxiety rate their back pain as more intense.

During pregnancy, a large percentage of women experience snoring and sleep apnea. Despite being frequently benign, this could also be a sign of a more serious condition. Snoring has been linked to high blood pressure in studies Trusted Source Wiley Online Library Wiley Online Library is one of the largest and most reliable electronic journal collections available, as well as a sizable and constantly expanding library of reference books and other books. The National Center for Biotechnology Information advances science and health by providing access to biomedical and genomic information. See Full Reference and preeclampsia Reliable Source The National Center for Biotechnology Information advances science and health by providing access to biomedical and genomic information, while sleep apnea may increase the risk of maternal morbidity Trusted Source National Library of Medicine, Biotech Information See Full Reference . Trusted Source National Library of Medicine, Biotech Information The National Center for Biotechnology Information advances science and health by providing access to biomedical and genomic information. Sleep apnea also appears to be linked to gestational diabetes. See Full Reference .

When does insomnia during pregnancy start?

While having trouble sleeping is normal at any stage of pregnancy, many expectant mothers begin to have problems during the second to third trimesters as other pregnancy symptoms worsen and a growing baby belly makes it more difficult than ever to get comfortable in bed.

Even so, first-trimester problems, such as morning sickness, which can strike at any time of the day or night, and a constant need to urinate, can wake you up from your comfortable bed and disrupt your sleep. But if you’re concerned that having insomnia might hurt your child, you can rest assured that it won’t. So try not to worry; sometimes just letting go of these emotions is enough to put you to sleep.

Insomnia is a bothersome pregnancy symptom that is, in part, caused by hormonal changes. Trusted SourceMayo ClinicSleep During Pregnancy: Follow These TipsSee All Sources [2] However, in addition to this well-known culprit, there are a number of other factors that could work together to keep you up at night, such as:

  • Frequent trips to the bathroom
  • Pregnancy heartburn, constipation or morning sickness
  • Aches and pains, including headache, round ligament pain or tender breasts
  • Leg cramps and restless leg syndrome
  • Vivid or disturbing dreams
  • A hopped-up metabolism that keeps the heat on even when its off
  • Difficulty getting comfortable with your growing belly
  • Kicking, flipping and rolling from your active baby on board
  • Pre-birth anxiety and worries
  • Body changes at 37th Week of Pregnancy Part 2

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